It is hard to imagine anyone taking advantage of your loved ones. Your parents were always kind and generous to those around them. Sadly, you believe that after your father passed away, your mother was manipulated throughout her grieving years.

It wasn’t until she passed away that you saw that she had changed her entire estate plan. You were no longer the executor of the estate, like she’d discussed with you years before. You have copies of the original estate plan, and what she has now is nothing like it. In fact, the people listed as heirs aren’t even related to you. It’s all very bizarre, and you’re sure that she was a victim of undue influence.

After looking into the situation, you found that she named someone who had been caring for her as the primary beneficiary. Interestingly enough, this person had been fired by your family weeks before your loved one’s death. This new development is certainly a cause for concern.

How can you prove undue influence?

In a case of undue influence, the facts speak for themselves. Do you have information about why you fired the care worker, such as evidence that they were stealing or manipulating your loved one? Do you have documents showing previous wills or estate plans? Perhaps you have documents showing that your mother was not in the right state of mind to change any legal documents.

Bring all of these things to your attorney. You may be able to go to probate court and fight the changes that were made to the estate plan without your knowledge.